Tel: 804.864.1100

Tel: 804.864.1100

Author Archive: Russell Lawson

Heading North for the Sierra Club

I am excited to have been invited by the Great Falls Group of the Sierra Club to join in the “Clean Energy Financing Workshop for Local Governments” that will be held this Friday (September 7) from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Fairfax County Government Center. I’ll be talking about one of our favorite topics: solar power purchase agreements (SPPA), an accessible way for financing renewable energy projects that local governments can use.

This brown bag lunch event is free, but registration is required as space is limited. If you can’t make it on Friday, I understand you can register as a virtual attendee and get access to the video after the session. Maybe I will see you there. If we miss each other, I can answer any questions about this topic or renewable energy development here, or just contact one of our renewable energy lawyers.

Collin Atkins Joins Business Practice

Collin Atkins, business lawyerCollin Atkins, a business attorney in private practice in Richmond, has joined the business, renewable energy and corporate law practice of GreeneHurlocker PLC, co-managing member Eric Hurlocker announced today.

“Collin joins us with significant experience working with corporate clients, as well as a number of years as in-house counsel for a manufacturer, which will enhance and expand the services that we provide to our business and renewable energy clients throughout the region,” Eric said.

Atkins focuses his practice on assisting clients who require advice in formation, contract drafting, and employment and regulatory concerns. In addition, he offers counsel on a wide variety of commercial agreements across different industries, including distribution, manufacturing, service, and technology related industries, which will contribute to the expansion of the firm’s OPENgc services.

“I’m excited about joining GreeneHurlocker and partnering with clients who are growing and expanding their businesses,” Collin explains.

Atkins will be based in the firm’s Richmond office, but will also have an office at the firm’s  Harrisonburg location to support the firm’s growing practice throughout the Shenandoah Valley.

Atkins earned his undergraduate degree in history from Presbyterian College in Clinton, South Carolina. He earned his J.D. at the William & Mary Law School, where he was a graduate research fellow and a member of the William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal.

Simple Guide to Electric Regulation Now New and Improved

If you have been wondering about the effect of Virginia’s 2018 General Assembly session on electric regulation in Virginia, Will Reisinger has good news for you. The GreeneHurlocker Principles of Electric Utility Regulation in Virginia, the firm’s complete guide to the state’s electric regulation laws, has been revised to incorporate legislation enacted by the 2018 General Assembly and signed by Governor Northam.
“The statutes governing Virginia’s electric utilities, found in Title 56 of the Code of Virginia, are extremely complex, but we’ve done our best to explain these laws in plain English,” Will, one of the firms energy lawyers, explains. The guidebook and its glossary of key terms is intended to be a reference tool for those who want to gain a better understanding of utility regulation and energy policy in Virginia. In 2018, the General Assembly made substantial changes to the rate setting portions of the law and added new incentives for utilities to invest in clean energy and grid transformation projects. The updated guidebook summarizes the major amendments made by the legislature earlier this year.
If you would like a copy of the guidebook, contact Will Reisinger or any of our energy lawyers, or download the complete document here.

Pending cases will have major impact on energy choice in Virginia

Our clients and colleagues have a lot of questions about the status of retail energy choice in Virginia. In this Energy Update special report, Will Reisinger breaks down the major legal issues and several pending court cases. These cases could determine whether Virginia expands – or restricts – customers’ access to new renewable energy and market-based rate options.