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regulation

SCC Approves New Large Customer Renewable Energy Tariff

wind turbines and solar arraysThe Virginia State Corporation Commission (“SCC” or “Commission”) just approved a new tariff that will give customers of Dominion Energy Virginia (“Dominion”) an additional option to purchase renewable energy. On November 6, 2018, the SCC entered a Final Order approving Dominion’s application to offer a voluntary tariff designated “Rate Schedule RG.” The tariff is available to large, non-residential customers who agree to purchase the output, including all environmental attributes, from particular renewable energy facilities.

Participating customers may request to purchase the output from specific types of generation resources, such as solar and wind energy facilities. Dominion would either construct a new renewable facility or enter into a contract with a third-party generator to obtain the renewable energy necessary to serve the customer. Schedule RG, therefore, presents an opportunity for customers to choose the type of renewable energy they want to purchase. For example, a customer could request that Dominion enter into a contract with a particular generator. Or the customer could request the utility to build a new renewable facility on the customer’s premises or in a particular geographic location. The minimum facility size is 1 MW in nameplate capacity.

Participation in Schedule RG is capped at 50 customers. The tariff is also designed to ensure that non-participating customers do not subsidize any of the costs associated with Schedule RG. For example, Dominion may not place any of the Schedule RG facility costs in its rate base or the cost of service charged to non-participating customers.

The financial transactions supporting Schedule RG are complex. Participating customers would stay on their existing tariff and continue to pay all existing utility riders. At the same time, however, customers would pay a fixed price to purchase the renewable energy and would receive a “Schedule RG Credit” that is based on the wholesale price of energy and the capacity of the facility. In this way, the Schedule RG arrangement is like a financial “swap.” That is, participating customers would agree to pay a pre-determined renewable energy contract price, but would also receive the market price for the energy, which would be sold by Dominion in the PJM wholesale market. Thus, Schedule RG is designed to approximate the actual market cost of renewable energy from particular generating facilities.

Several parties intervened in the case, including Walmart and two renewable and advanced energy trade associations. While several parties offered comments on the proposal, no party to the case opposed Schedule RG.

The SCC approved the application subject to several reporting requirements. The SCC also held that Schedule RG will expire after three years if no customers participate.

Finally, it is important to note that Schedule RG was not approved under Va. Code § 56-577 A 5 and would not constitute a 100% renewable energy tariff under this statutory provision. As we explained in our Regulatory Guide, this Code section authorizes any Virginia customer to purchase electricity “provided 100% from renewable energy” from non-utility suppliers, so long as the customer’s incumbent electric utility does not offer an SCC-approved tariff for 100% renewable energy. Therefore, if Dominion received approval to offer a 100% renewable energy tariff pursuant to Va. Code § 56-577 A 5, Dominion customers would lose their existing rights to shop for such energy.

Currently, no Virginia utility offers an SCC-approved 100% renewable energy tariff. Dominion and Appalachian Power have both applied for approval to offer such tariffs, which thus far have been rejected. In the last three years, the SCC has rejected two 100% renewable tariffs proposed by Appalachian Power and one proposed by Dominion. Dominion currently has one application pending, which would be available to residential and small commercial customers.

The SCC’s Final Order in Schedule RG, Case No. PUR-2017-00163, is available here. If you have any questions about Schedule RG or other renewable energy options offered by Virginia utilities, please contact one of our energy regulatory attorneys.

Simple Guide to Electric Regulation Now New and Improved

If you have been wondering about the effect of Virginia’s 2018 General Assembly session on electric regulation in Virginia, Will Reisinger has good news for you. The GreeneHurlocker Principles of Electric Utility Regulation in Virginia, the firm’s complete guide to the state’s electric regulation laws, has been revised to incorporate legislation enacted by the 2018 General Assembly and signed by Governor Northam.
“The statutes governing Virginia’s electric utilities, found in Title 56 of the Code of Virginia, are extremely complex, but we’ve done our best to explain these laws in plain English,” Will, one of the firms energy lawyers, explains. The guidebook and its glossary of key terms is intended to be a reference tool for those who want to gain a better understanding of utility regulation and energy policy in Virginia. In 2018, the General Assembly made substantial changes to the rate setting portions of the law and added new incentives for utilities to invest in clean energy and grid transformation projects. The updated guidebook summarizes the major amendments made by the legislature earlier this year.
If you would like a copy of the guidebook, contact Will Reisinger or any of our energy lawyers, or download the complete document here.

Pending cases will have major impact on energy choice in Virginia

Our clients and colleagues have a lot of questions about the status of retail energy choice in Virginia. In this Energy Update special report, Will Reisinger breaks down the major legal issues and several pending court cases. These cases could determine whether Virginia expands – or restricts – customers’ access to new renewable energy and market-based rate options.

Dominion, Appalachian Power Dispute SCC Decision

SCC CASE UPDATE:

Last week we told you about an important State Corporation Commission (“SCC” or “Commission”) decision that could expand access to competitive electric supply in Virginia. The SCC approved a request filed by a group of manufacturing customers to combine their demands for purposes of shopping for competitive electric supply. The SCC found that their request was “in the public interest.” The SCC approved the customers’ application over the objections of both Dominion Energy Virginia (“Dominion”) and Appalachian Power Company (“APCo”). Dominion argued that allowing the companies to shop for competitive electric supply would “erode a significant portion of the utility’s jurisdictional customer base.”

Both utilities are now appealing the decision to the Virginia Supreme Court. Dominion filed a notice of appeal with the SCC on March 21, while APCo filed its notice on March 15. The utilities have not yet filed their assignments of error (i.e., their grounds for appealing the decision).

Appeals from the SCC are “of right,” meaning the Supreme Court is required to hear any case that’s properly appealed.  While the Court can overturn any of the Commission’s findings, the Court usually gives deference to the SCC. The Court has frequently said that SCC decisions are “entitled to the respect due judgments of a tribunal informed by experience” and that Commission orders won’t be disturbed if “based upon the application of the correct principles of law.”

We’ll keep you updated on the status of this important case. If you want to talk about this case, the SCC’s role, or energy law and regulation, just call any of our energy lawyers.

Update on Supplier Consolidated Billing in Maryland

Maryland State House (side)

Maryland State House (side) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Last fall, Brian Greene discussed the Maryland Public Service Commission’s retail energy supplier consolidated billing proceeding. The Commission is considering supplier consolidated billing as an additional billing option for Maryland customers, alongside the existing utility consolidated billing and dual billing options. With supplier consolidated billing, customers would receive a single bill from their competitive retail supplier that includes both the electricity and natural gas supply charges (from the competitive supplier) and the utility’s transportation and distribution charges.

Under the existing billing paradigm in Maryland, the vast majority of customers receive a consolidated bill from their utility that includes both the energy supply charges and the utility’s transportation and distribution charges. Supplier consolidated billing would flip that model, enabling the competitive supplier to bill the customer, with the flexibility to expand product and service offerings. More information on the details of the proposal are available in the Petition and Reply Comments filed by the petitioning retail energy suppliers (NRG Energy, Inc., Interstate Gas Supply, Inc., Just Energy Group, Inc., Direct Energy Services, LLC, and ENGIE Resources, LLC).

In November 2017, stakeholders submitted extensive comments discussing the benefits and potential risks associated with the supplier consolidated billing proposal. Copies of the comments are publicly available in the Commission’s docket for Case No. 9461.

Following submission of the written comments, the Commission held a legislative-style hearing on February 20th and 21st. Here is a short summary of the two-day hearing:

  • The hearing began with a presentation from the Petitioners in support of supplier consolidated billing. The panel presented and answered questions from the Commissioner for about 2.5 hours.
  • Maryland’s distribution utility stakeholders followed the Petitioners, presenting their views on SCB and responding to the Petitioners’ presentation.
  • Following the utilities, a competitive retail energy supplier panel offered support for SCB, with some offering tweaks to the proposed program.
  • The next panel included public sector stakeholders from the Maryland Energy Administration and Montgomery County offering support for the proposed supplier consolidated billing program and suggestions regarding some of the program details. The Maryland Office of People’s Counsel also presented, discussing what it perceives as potential risks of the program.
  • Commission Staff rounded out the presentations, discussing the merits of the SCB proposal, offering support for the concept and at least one recommendation to alter the proposal.
  • The hearing concluded with the Petitioners offering a few final comments responding to some of the points raised by other stakeholders during the hearing.

After concluding the hearing, the next step is for the Commission to take further action on the proposal. If you are interested in the pending SCB petition in Maryland or any related competitive retail energy market issues, please contact one of GreeneHurlocker’s mid-Atlantic energy lawyers.

Appearing at the MPSC Hearing: From L to R – Brian Greene, Mike Starck (NRG Energy), Duncan Stiles (Just Energy), Tami Wilson (IGS Energy), and Alex Donaho (Direct Energy).

Delaware Sets Hearing for Retail Market Enhancements

The Delaware Public Service Commission has established a March 8, 2018 hearing date to consider retail choice enhancements.

The Delaware General Assembly meets in the Leg...

The Delaware General Assembly meets in the Legislative Hall in Dover. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The enhancements include a purchase of receivables program; “seamless moves” where customers may move within the utility service territory and maintain their supplier; “ instant connects” where customers may sign up with a supplier on their first day of service; an “enroll with your wallet” program where customers may enroll with a supplier without the use of their utility account number or other utility-assigned identifier; improvements to the Commission’s shopping website; and utility bill inserts to promote choice.

The proceeding has been pending since the end of 2015 when the Electricity Affordability Committee created by the Delaware General Assembly filed a petition with the Commission. Since that time, the parties have filed written comments and participated in working group meetings. Also, the case was stayed for a period of time while the parties and the Commission finalized amendments to the Delaware Electric Supplier Rules.

The case will be heard before a hearing examiner. The primary participants in the case are the Staff of the Commission, Delmarva Power, the Delaware Public Advocate, and the Retail Energy Supply Association (RESA). GreeneHurlocker is representing RESA in the proceeding.

For more information, please contact one of our regulatory attorneys.

Electric Utility Regulation Plain and Simple

As the 2018 General Assembly heats up, we expect energy issues to be front and center once again. That’s one of the reasons we just published Principles of Electric Utility Regulation in Virginia, a guidebook designed to provide a plain-English explanation of some of the state laws regulating Virginia’s two largest monopoly electric utilities.

Do you have questions about the role of the State Corporation Commission in setting rates? Wonder why you’re not getting a refund from your electric utility this year? Curious about whether energy companies are incentivized to invest in clean energy? This booklet answers these questions and provides a starting place for exploring Virginia’s complex regulatory system.

We hope this document will be a useful tool for legislators and their staff, the media, and all citizens who want to gain a better understanding of energy policy in Virginia. The link at the top will get you the electronic version immediately. If you would prefer your copy be a printed one, just contact Will Reisinger or any of our Virginia energy lawyers.

Energy Secretary Perry Concerned With Grid Resiliency

Eric Wallace covers the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) sent by Secretary of Energy Rick Perry to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in regard to grid resiliency.

Virginia Energy Laws and Regulations Demystified

The GreeneHurlocker law firm has just published Principles of Electric Utility Regulation in Virginia, a guidebook designed to provide a plain-English explanation of some of the state laws regulating Virginia’s two largest monopoly electric utilities, explained co-managing member Eric Hurlocker, one of the firm’s energy law attorneys.

“The statutes governing Virginia’s electric utilities, found in Title 56 of the Code of Virginia, are extremely complex, but we’ve made our best effort at helping citizens who must do business with and purchase energy from Dominion Energy Virginia and Appalachian Power Company understand the rules in plain English,” said Hurlocker.

Co-Authored by regulatory lawyer Will Reisinger at the firm, the guidebook and its glossary of key terms is intended to be a reference tool for those who want to gain a better understanding of utility regulation and energy policy in Virginia.

“We hope this document will be useful for legislators and their staff, lobbyists, the media, as well as all citizens,” stated Reisinger.

Hurlocker has focused for more than two decades on advising clients in the areas of energy law as well as commercial transactions and general corporate work for energy and technology companies, manufacturers and services providers. After working in large law firms and for utility firms, Hurlocker joined with Brian Greene five years ago to form the GreeneHurlocker firm, which concentrates on work in energy law and for businesses in the energy space.

Reisinger, before joining GreeneHurlocker in 2016, served in the Office of the Attorney General of Virginia representing ratepayers in energy and utility matters before the Virginia State Corporation Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Supreme Court of Virginia. Earlier, he was a staff attorney for a non-profit environmental organization, where he worked to enforce state and federal environmental standards.

Persons interested in a copy of the guidebook can contact Hurlocker, Reisinger or download the complete guidebook here.

Virginia Moves Forward with Carbon Cap and Trade Plan

But some uncertainties remain.

coal-fired plant in VirginiaOn Thursday, November 16, the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board unanimously approved a draft rule designed to reduce carbon emissions from fossil generating facilities operating in the Commonwealth. The highly complex regulation, if implemented, would require Virginia generating facilities to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (“RGGI”) trading system. The regulation will be administered by the Air Board and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (“DEQ”).

Following the publication of the rule, which is expected to occur in December or early January, 2018, there is a 60-day period in which the public and interested parties may provide comment on the rule. Following this public comment period, the Air Board would vote on the final rule in 2018.

The proposed rule would establish an initial statewide carbon cap of either 33 or 34 million tons, which represents the amount of carbon dioxide forecasted to be emitted in the Commonwealth in 2020. The carbon rule does not require generators to purchase emissions allowances from the Commonwealth in an auction, thus avoiding a state requirement that all revenue-raising measures must be approved by the General Assembly. Instead, generators will be freely allocated allowances, which they will thereafter consign to the RGGI auction.

Allowances purchased at the RGGI auction would no longer be conditional – meaning that generators will surrender these RGGI allowances to DEQ in order to cover their emissions. For each conditional allowance consigned to the auction, the generator will receive the clearing price of the auction. This allows generators to consign all of their conditional allowances but only purchase what they need.

Under the rule, therefore, utilities and other power plant operators would have an incentive to reduce emissions to avoid having to purchase additional allowances. Any unneeded emissions allowances must be sold in the RGGI trading system, with the proceeds credited to Virginia utility customers. However, the rule does not specify precisely how such proceeds would flow back to consumers.

The regulation would only apply to generation facilities that are 25 MW or larger in capacity. There are approximately 32 such facilities in Virginia that will be subject to the rule.

Between 2020 and 2030, the statewide carbon cap would be reduced by 3 percent each year, meaning that generating facilities would either need to reduce emissions or purchase additional emissions allowances.

The draft regulation represents the first time Virginia has attempted to regulate the amount of carbon that may be emitted by existing power plants. DEQ has regulated carbon emissions from new power plants since 2011.

Attorney General Mark Herring, in an official opinion issued in May, 2017, found that a carbon cap and trade program would be lawful. The Attorney General found that the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board, under existing law, is “authorized to regulate ‘air pollution’” and to promulgate regulations “abating, controlling and prohibition air pollution.” Under Virginia law, “air pollution includes “substances which are or may be harmful or injurious to human health, welfare or safety, or to property.” The Attorney General also stated that “it is well settled that [greenhouse gases] fall within this definition.”

Virginia’s regulation will take the place of the federal Clean Power Plan, which is in the process of being repealed by the Environmental Protection Agency. Please contact one of our regulatory attorneys should you have questions about this draft rule.