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The GreeneHurlocker Blog

Delaware Sets Hearing for Retail Market Enhancements

The Delaware Public Service Commission has established a March 8, 2018 hearing date to consider retail choice enhancements.

The Delaware General Assembly meets in the Leg...

The Delaware General Assembly meets in the Legislative Hall in Dover. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The enhancements include a purchase of receivables program; “seamless moves” where customers may move within the utility service territory and maintain their supplier; “ instant connects” where customers may sign up with a supplier on their first day of service; an “enroll with your wallet” program where customers may enroll with a supplier without the use of their utility account number or other utility-assigned identifier; improvements to the Commission’s shopping website; and utility bill inserts to promote choice.

The proceeding has been pending since the end of 2015 when the Electricity Affordability Committee created by the Delaware General Assembly filed a petition with the Commission. Since that time, the parties have filed written comments and participated in working group meetings. Also, the case was stayed for a period of time while the parties and the Commission finalized amendments to the Delaware Electric Supplier Rules.

The case will be heard before a hearing examiner. The primary participants in the case are the Staff of the Commission, Delmarva Power, the Delaware Public Advocate, and the Retail Energy Supply Association (RESA). GreeneHurlocker is representing RESA in the proceeding.

For more information, please contact one of our regulatory attorneys.

ALERT: Trump Imposes Tariff on Solar Module Imports

Client Alert

Section 201 Proceeding Announcement:

 On Monday January 22, the U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced and on January 23, President Trump signed am executive order to provide relief to U.S. manufacturers and impose safeguard tariffs on imported solar cells and modules, based on the investigations, findings, and recommendations of the independent, bipartisan U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC).

The U.S. Trade Representative recommended, and the President chose to take action by applying, the following additional duties on imported solar cells and modules:

Year 1:                  30%
Year 2:                  25%
Year 3:                  20%
Year 4:                  15%.

The first 2.5 gigawatt of imported cells are excluded from the additional tariff.  We are continuing to monitor the imposition of these duties and will provide additional information on our website as available.  If you have any questions, please contact any of our renewable energy or administrative law attorneys.

Energy Secretary Perry Concerned With Grid Resiliency

Eric Wallace covers the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) sent by Secretary of Energy Rick Perry to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in regard to grid resiliency.

Virginia Moves Forward with Carbon Cap and Trade Plan

But some uncertainties remain.

coal-fired plant in VirginiaOn Thursday, November 16, the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board unanimously approved a draft rule designed to reduce carbon emissions from fossil generating facilities operating in the Commonwealth. The highly complex regulation, if implemented, would require Virginia generating facilities to participate in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (“RGGI”) trading system. The regulation will be administered by the Air Board and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (“DEQ”).

Following the publication of the rule, which is expected to occur in December or early January, 2018, there is a 60-day period in which the public and interested parties may provide comment on the rule. Following this public comment period, the Air Board would vote on the final rule in 2018.

The proposed rule would establish an initial statewide carbon cap of either 33 or 34 million tons, which represents the amount of carbon dioxide forecasted to be emitted in the Commonwealth in 2020. The carbon rule does not require generators to purchase emissions allowances from the Commonwealth in an auction, thus avoiding a state requirement that all revenue-raising measures must be approved by the General Assembly. Instead, generators will be freely allocated allowances, which they will thereafter consign to the RGGI auction.

Allowances purchased at the RGGI auction would no longer be conditional – meaning that generators will surrender these RGGI allowances to DEQ in order to cover their emissions. For each conditional allowance consigned to the auction, the generator will receive the clearing price of the auction. This allows generators to consign all of their conditional allowances but only purchase what they need.

Under the rule, therefore, utilities and other power plant operators would have an incentive to reduce emissions to avoid having to purchase additional allowances. Any unneeded emissions allowances must be sold in the RGGI trading system, with the proceeds credited to Virginia utility customers. However, the rule does not specify precisely how such proceeds would flow back to consumers.

The regulation would only apply to generation facilities that are 25 MW or larger in capacity. There are approximately 32 such facilities in Virginia that will be subject to the rule.

Between 2020 and 2030, the statewide carbon cap would be reduced by 3 percent each year, meaning that generating facilities would either need to reduce emissions or purchase additional emissions allowances.

The draft regulation represents the first time Virginia has attempted to regulate the amount of carbon that may be emitted by existing power plants. DEQ has regulated carbon emissions from new power plants since 2011.

Attorney General Mark Herring, in an official opinion issued in May, 2017, found that a carbon cap and trade program would be lawful. The Attorney General found that the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board, under existing law, is “authorized to regulate ‘air pollution’” and to promulgate regulations “abating, controlling and prohibition air pollution.” Under Virginia law, “air pollution includes “substances which are or may be harmful or injurious to human health, welfare or safety, or to property.” The Attorney General also stated that “it is well settled that [greenhouse gases] fall within this definition.”

Virginia’s regulation will take the place of the federal Clean Power Plan, which is in the process of being repealed by the Environmental Protection Agency. Please contact one of our regulatory attorneys should you have questions about this draft rule.

SE Renewable Energy Conference 

Great two days in Atlanta with solar and wind developers, financiers, regulators and utilities discussing state of the market in the Southeast.  New tax reform and panel tariff cases at the forefront of discussions.  If you would like an update on the conference or have other renewable energy development questions, don’t hesitate to contact one of our energy lawyers.

Dominion Issues RFP for New Solar and Wind Energy

wind turbines and solar arraysEarlier this week Dominion Energy Virginia (“Dominion”) released a request for proposals (“RFP”) for 300 MW of new solar and onshore wind energy. The company is seeking to either sign power purchase agreements or purchase renewable energy projects that are under development. The facilities must be capable of producing power by 2019 or 2020.

Dominion released its RFP after announcing that it will offer a new renewable energy tariff (“Schedule RF”), which the company intends to file with the State Corporation Commission in the coming weeks. Schedule RF is intended to serve Facebook, which is building a one million square foot data center in eastern Henrico County, and other large commercial customers. Under the proposed Schedule RF tariff, participating customers would purchase the renewable energy attributes of new facilities that are added to the grid.

Notices of intent to bid are due by 5:00PM on October 27, 2017, and responses to the RFP are due on December 1, 2017. The RFP directs bidders to provide their best and final price when providing a proposal. In addition to the price, the RFP document states that Dominion will consider “non-price” criteria when evaluating proposals, including the economic development impacts for Virginia and the financial strength of the firm submitting a bid.

For more information about this RFP or the regulations affecting renewable energy development in Virginia, please contact one of our renewable energy lawyers or regulatory attorneys.

Has Your Company Registered as a Foreign Entity?

Blair Powell, business and energy lawyer, explains what it means to be required to register in a jurisdiction as a foreign entity and what penalties may accrue if you fail to do so.

For more information, contact Blair or any of our business lawyers.

Moves Towards Supplier Consolidated Billing

In this Energy Update, Brian Greene explains how Maryland’s Public Service Commission is soliciting comments on the implementation of supplier consolidated billing. For more information about billing plans and regulation, contact Brian or any of our mid-Atlantic energy lawyers.

More Appalachian Power Customers Choosing Solar Energy

An article in yesterday’s News & Advance profiled a Lynchburg business that has invested over half a million dollars to produce solar energy at its headquarters. BMS Direct, a company that processes invoices and billing statements, now has over 900 solar panels on the roof of its 80,000-square-foot facility in Lynchburg. The solar panels now supply about half of the company’s electric needs, and the resulting energy savings are expected to pay for the cost of the system in six years.

Several factors, including declining solar panel prices and federal investment tax credits, make it a great time to invest in solar energy. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association (“SEIA”), solar has experienced an average annual growth rate of 68%, while installed solar prices have dropped 55% over the last five years. The installed cost of a solar installation is now between $2.30 per watt and $2.75 per watt for residential systems and $1.40 per watt and $2.20 per watt for commercial systems. Federal law currently authorizes a 30% tax credit for residential and commercial solar systems, although this percentage is scheduled to decline beginning in 2020.

Virginia law allows all customers to generate their own renewable energy on site by “net metering.” Electric utilities in Virginia are required to offer net metering programs, which allow residential customers and businesses like BMS Direct to install renewable energy facilities on their property. Net metering customers only have to pay their utility for their electricity usage that is in excess of what they generate on site. Appalachian Power (“APCo”) says that about 750 of its customers participate in the net metering program.

Moreover, Virginia customers are also currently permitted to purchase 100% renewable energy, including solar, from non-utility companies. Under Virginia law, most customers are allowed to purchase renewable generation from third-party suppliers only if their incumbent electric utility does not have an approved tariff for 100% renewable energy. See Va. Code Section 56-577(A)(5). However, no Virginia utility currently offers a 100% renewable energy option for its customers. As we have written about here, the Virginia State Corporation Commission (“SCC”) recently rejected a renewable energy tariff proposal by APCo that, if approved, would have prevented its customers from purchasing solar energy from third-party suppliers.

The SCC is also currently considering a similar renewable tariff application filed by Dominion Energy Virginia (“Dominion”) in SCC Case No.PUR-2017-00060. If approved, Dominion’s tariff would limit clean energy choices for its large customers, and potentially other classes of customers in the future.

If you want to learn more about the regulations governing solar installations, and whether developing a solar energy project may make sense for you or your business, please contact one of our renewable energy lawyers or regulatory attorneys.

Retail Suppliers Petition MD Commission for Supplier Consolidated Billing

Earlier this month, five competitive retail suppliers (NRG Energy, Inc., Interstate Gas Supply, Inc., Just Energy Group, Inc., Direct Energy Services, LLC, and ENGIE Resources LLC) filed a petition electricity controlswith the Maryland Public Service Commission to implement supplier consolidated billing. If approved, the petition would allow retail suppliers to directly bill customers for both retail generation supply charges and utility distribution charges. Utility consolidated billing (where the utility bills customers for both the utility’s charges and the supplier’s charges) has been in the norm since Maryland restructured its energy market to enable retail competition.

The Maryland petition seeks to flip that model on its head. According to the petitioners, the supplier consolidated billing (“SCB”) model is a significant step in the evolution of competitive retail energy markets. In Texas, where SCB has been the standard for many years, suppliers have more flexibility to inform customers about their energy usage, develop innovative products and service structures, and adapt their customers’ bills to accommodate changes in the market. With SCB in place in Maryland, suppliers will be able to introduce new products and services that are not possible under the current utility billing model. As examples, suppliers will be able to offer flat billing options – where customers pay a set amount each month no matter how much energy they use or when they use it – and prepay service options – where customers pay in advance for their energy usage and then the energy they use counts against their account balance, with regular updates on the funds in their account and no surprise bills at the end of the month. In addition to these billing options, suppliers will be able to better inform customers about their usage and offer other energy-related products and services to Maryland customers.

Here are some quick points addressed in the SCB petition:

  • Supplier Qualifications – Suppliers must meet specific experience, operations, and financial security requirements to offer SCB services.
  • Receivables – Suppliers must purchase the full value of the utility’s receivables (for utility distribution charges) and take on responsibility for billing those amounts through to the customer.
  • Disconnect for Non-Payment – Currently, when a customer does not pay their utility bill, they will eventually have their service disconnected. With SCB, the same result would occur – with all existing customer safeguards remaining – but the supplier would initiate disconnects by notifying the utility that no payment has been received. From there, the utility would utilize existing disconnect procedures, including notifications to the customer. According to the petition, it is imperative that suppliers offering SCB services have the same tools at their disposal as to the utilities to manage their bad debt and encourage timely collections.

The Commission issued a Notice on September 15th requesting comments on the petition by November 15, 2017. If you are interested in learning more about the Maryland SCB petition or other issues affecting competitive retail energy markets in Maryland and other Mid-Atlantic jurisdictions, please contact GreeneHurlocker’s energy lawyers and regulatory attorneys.