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Tag Archive: Solar power

Solar and Wind Take Center Stage at the 2018 Virginia Energy Conference

wind turbines and solar arraysRenewable energy development, driven by rising corporate demand, was a central theme of Wednesday’s 2018 Virginia Energy Conference, hosted by the Virginia Chamber of Commerce. Garret Bean, Vice President of Development for sPower and one of the keynote speakers at the conference, discussed his company’s proposed 500-megawatt facility in Spotsylvania County, which will serve corporate customers in Virginia. Microsoft announced that it will purchase 315 MW of energy from sPower’s 500 MW project as part of its sustainability goal of 60 percent renewable energy by early 2020. In addition to Microsoft, major global companies including Google, Apple, Facebook, and Walmart have joined together to commit to 100% renewable power as a part of the RE100 initiative.

In his keynote, Bean explained that rapid data center development in Virginia, sustaining 70 percent of the world’s internet traffic, coupled with customer demand for cloud services powered by clean energy sources, presents a significant opportunity for growth in Virginia’s renewable energy sector. However, with the growth of renewable energy, developers are facing siting, permitting, and interconnection challenges that will have to be overcome.

Delegate Terry Kilgore, Senator Frank Wagner, and Secretary of Natural Resources Matt Strickler also discussed the opportunities and challenges of Virginia’s renewable energy industry. Senator Wagner voiced concerns about Virginia’s proposed regulations to link to the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) and participate in its regional greenhouse gas emissions cap-and-trade program. However, with the passage of SB 966 this session, paving the way for 5,000 megawatts of solar and wind energy in Virginia, and Governor Northam’s announcement that the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy has posted a Request for Proposals for contracts to help strengthen Virginia’s offshore wind supply chain and service industry, the future for Virginia’s renewable energy industry is looking bright.

If you have questions about Virginia’s renewable energy industry, legislation, or regulatory structure, please contact one of GreeneHurlocker’s energy and regulatory lawyers.

Solar Plant Planned for Richmond

As we previously discussed here, last month it was announced that President Trump signed an executive order to impose a 30% tariff on imported solar cells and modules. While there are many critics of the tariff, one local Virginia businessman hopes the tariff will help lead to Virginia’s first solar panel manufacturing facility.

As reported in the Richmond Times Dispatch article, Charles Bush has transformed a 16,000 square foot former die plant off Midlothian Turnpike in South Richmond to a potential solar panel manufacturing facility. He hopes that as manufacturers look for solar panel manufacturing plants in the United States as a result of the tariff, his plant will be attractive given that its “ready to go.” Bush stated that as of now, the plant can produce 460 solar panels a day, but he hopes to double capacity within the first year of operation.

We look forward to following Mr. Bush’s facility and hope to see solar panel manufacturing in Virginia soon!

If you have any questions regarding the solar tariff or solar energy market, please contact one of our renewable energy lawyers.

ALERT: Trump Imposes Tariff on Solar Module Imports

Client Alert

Section 201 Proceeding Announcement:

 On Monday January 22, the U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer announced and on January 23, President Trump signed am executive order to provide relief to U.S. manufacturers and impose safeguard tariffs on imported solar cells and modules, based on the investigations, findings, and recommendations of the independent, bipartisan U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC).

The U.S. Trade Representative recommended, and the President chose to take action by applying, the following additional duties on imported solar cells and modules:

Year 1:                  30%
Year 2:                  25%
Year 3:                  20%
Year 4:                  15%.

The first 2.5 gigawatt of imported cells are excluded from the additional tariff.  We are continuing to monitor the imposition of these duties and will provide additional information on our website as available.  If you have any questions, please contact any of our renewable energy or administrative law attorneys.

SE Renewable Energy Conference 

Great two days in Atlanta with solar and wind developers, financiers, regulators and utilities discussing state of the market in the Southeast.  New tax reform and panel tariff cases at the forefront of discussions.  If you would like an update on the conference or have other renewable energy development questions, don’t hesitate to contact one of our energy lawyers.

Dominion Issues RFP for New Solar and Wind Energy

wind turbines and solar arraysEarlier this week Dominion Energy Virginia (“Dominion”) released a request for proposals (“RFP”) for 300 MW of new solar and onshore wind energy. The company is seeking to either sign power purchase agreements or purchase renewable energy projects that are under development. The facilities must be capable of producing power by 2019 or 2020.

Dominion released its RFP after announcing that it will offer a new renewable energy tariff (“Schedule RF”), which the company intends to file with the State Corporation Commission in the coming weeks. Schedule RF is intended to serve Facebook, which is building a one million square foot data center in eastern Henrico County, and other large commercial customers. Under the proposed Schedule RF tariff, participating customers would purchase the renewable energy attributes of new facilities that are added to the grid.

Notices of intent to bid are due by 5:00PM on October 27, 2017, and responses to the RFP are due on December 1, 2017. The RFP directs bidders to provide their best and final price when providing a proposal. In addition to the price, the RFP document states that Dominion will consider “non-price” criteria when evaluating proposals, including the economic development impacts for Virginia and the financial strength of the firm submitting a bid.

For more information about this RFP or the regulations affecting renewable energy development in Virginia, please contact one of our renewable energy lawyers or regulatory attorneys.

More Appalachian Power Customers Choosing Solar Energy

An article in yesterday’s News & Advance profiled a Lynchburg business that has invested over half a million dollars to produce solar energy at its headquarters. BMS Direct, a company that processes invoices and billing statements, now has over 900 solar panels on the roof of its 80,000-square-foot facility in Lynchburg. The solar panels now supply about half of the company’s electric needs, and the resulting energy savings are expected to pay for the cost of the system in six years.

Several factors, including declining solar panel prices and federal investment tax credits, make it a great time to invest in solar energy. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association (“SEIA”), solar has experienced an average annual growth rate of 68%, while installed solar prices have dropped 55% over the last five years. The installed cost of a solar installation is now between $2.30 per watt and $2.75 per watt for residential systems and $1.40 per watt and $2.20 per watt for commercial systems. Federal law currently authorizes a 30% tax credit for residential and commercial solar systems, although this percentage is scheduled to decline beginning in 2020.

Virginia law allows all customers to generate their own renewable energy on site by “net metering.” Electric utilities in Virginia are required to offer net metering programs, which allow residential customers and businesses like BMS Direct to install renewable energy facilities on their property. Net metering customers only have to pay their utility for their electricity usage that is in excess of what they generate on site. Appalachian Power (“APCo”) says that about 750 of its customers participate in the net metering program.

Moreover, Virginia customers are also currently permitted to purchase 100% renewable energy, including solar, from non-utility companies. Under Virginia law, most customers are allowed to purchase renewable generation from third-party suppliers only if their incumbent electric utility does not have an approved tariff for 100% renewable energy. See Va. Code Section 56-577(A)(5). However, no Virginia utility currently offers a 100% renewable energy option for its customers. As we have written about here, the Virginia State Corporation Commission (“SCC”) recently rejected a renewable energy tariff proposal by APCo that, if approved, would have prevented its customers from purchasing solar energy from third-party suppliers.

The SCC is also currently considering a similar renewable tariff application filed by Dominion Energy Virginia (“Dominion”) in SCC Case No.PUR-2017-00060. If approved, Dominion’s tariff would limit clean energy choices for its large customers, and potentially other classes of customers in the future.

If you want to learn more about the regulations governing solar installations, and whether developing a solar energy project may make sense for you or your business, please contact one of our renewable energy lawyers or regulatory attorneys.

Community Solar Growing in Mid-Atlantic

Eric Wallace explains what’s driving the increase in interest and use for community solar energy generating facilities in mid-Atlantic jurisdictions such as Maryland and the District of Columbia. For more information about community solar projects and regulation, contact Eric or any of our mid-Atlantic energy lawyers.

Charlottesville Sets Sights on Renewables

future of renewables meetingIndustry and business leaders in Charlottesville are poised to put a big effort behind renewable energy at the upcoming Tom Tom energy program April 13 & 14. “Innovations in Energy: Future of Renewables” is the agenda on Thursday, April 13 (6PM) at the Paramount Theater. The next day, they will be launching the Charlottesville Renewable Energy Alliance at a Founders Summit Luncheon, an initiative that will positively impact Charlottesville’s community and economy. A number of our clients and friends are among those spearheading this new focus.

We’re definitely showing up and we hope you will look for us when you join the crowd at this innovative new group. If you have any questions about the renewable energy initiative or renewable energy development, please call Eric Hurlocker or any of our energy lawyers.

SCC greenlights Dominion plan to build 20 MW solar facility in Fauquier County

sunset-solar-squareOn Wednesday, February 1, the Virginia State Corporation Commission approved an application filed by Dominion Virginia Power to construct and operate a 20 MW solar generating facility near the town of Remington, in Fauquier County. Virginia. Dominion will sell the output of the facility to the Commonwealth of Virginia under a 25-year power purchase agreement. Dominion estimates that the total cost of the project will be $46 million. The terms of the agreement, however, including the price that the state agreed to pay for the energy, are confidential and were not disclosed to the Commission.

The SCC rejected Dominion’s first application to build and operate the Remington facility in 2015. In the 2015 case, Dominion sought to increase customer rates in order to pay for the Remington project, which would have provided power to all of the company’s retail customers. But the Commission rejected Dominion’s application after finding that the company had not complied with a Virginia statute requiring it to consider third-party alternatives. Specifically, Virginia law requires utilities, when proposing to build new generation facilities, to demonstrate that they considered whether the same energy could have been obtained for a lower price from non-utility companies.

The Commission’s final order on Wednesday, however, found that this law should not apply to Dominion’s new application because the Commonwealth of Virginia is the sole purchaser of the energy. The Commission noted that the Commonwealth is a “non-jurisdictional retail electric customer” and thus “the rates and charges it pays generally fall outside of the Commission’s regulatory authority.” The Commission also explained that Dominion will “recover its costs exclusively through contracts negotiated with the Commonwealth” and not “through any Virginia jurisdictional retail electric rates established by the Commission.”

The Commission admitted that it had “not reviewed or evaluated the terms of the Commonwealth’s contract with Dominion, including the financial terms of [the] arrangement.” Therefore, it is unclear at what price the Commonwealth agreed to purchase the Remington energy, or whether solar energy could have been obtained from another seller at a lower cost to taxpayers.

Dominion has announced plans to build at least 400 MW of solar energy in Virginia by 2020. And, as we have discussed previously, several bills currently under consideration by the General Assembly could further accelerate the development of solar energy in Virginia. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality reports that there are seven other solar facilities at least 20 MW in size that have been permitted by the state and in various stages of construction.

Please contact one of our energy lawyers or regulatory attorneys should you have questions about this solar project or other renewable energy initiatives in Virginia.